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Author Archives for ‘Andy Beal’

About Andy Beal

Andy Beal is the founder & CEO of Trackur, a leader in social media monitoring tools. The author of Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation and coauthor of the critically-acclaimed book Radically Transparent, Andy Beal is known around the world as the "Indiana Jones of Reputation Management." In his free time, Andy enjoys photography, tennis, and playing the ukulele.

Google Reputation Repair Kit infographic

If ever you need to repair a damaged Google reputation, our sister company Reputation Refinery has you covered. If you want to try and fix your search engine reputation yourself, this infographic has a lot of great pointers. Head over to Reputation Refinery’s Google Reputation Repair Kit infographic.

Which flavor of results do you like best?

With our easy to use dashboard, we’ve always made it easy for you to select the different sources you wish to see in your dashboard results. In our quest to make Trackur the easiest and most comprehensive social media monitoring tool you’ll ever use, we just made it even easier to view only the sources that are of interest to you. Now, you can select which source you wish to view without having to re-run your search each time. Simply head to the sorting options and click the new “Source” view: Once you’ve made your choice, you see only results

Updated Insights: view beyond the past 24 hours!

It has been four years since we added Insights to your Trackur dashboard. We’ve made some major improvements over that time, but the one that has always escaped us: giving you more than just the past 24 hours of data. Today, we finally cracked that nut! As of today, you can switch your Insights view between 24hrs, 7 days and 30 days. With this change, you can get a better idea of how your reputation–and online mentions–have trended. In addition, you can now download each of those views to a PDF report. Why did it take so long? It’s a

Updates: Trackur API v2.0 and Improved Custom Feeds

Over the past few months we have been hard at work revamping our Senfluence Full Media Monitoring API. Not only have we improved all of our back-end crawling and parsing, we added new features and greatly simplified the API structure. Here are the highlights: Request caching – Requests for the same information within a 30 second period are set to be cached, allowing instant retrieval of unchanged result lists. More filters – Results can now be filtered by sentiment and/or country. No forced request structure – Gone is the preset /api_key/keyword/limit/offset/etc/etc/etc/ format, which caused numerous issues for filtering by source when

86% would pay more for a service provider with positive reviews

A couple of years ago, we started adding review sites to our social media monitoring and new research from Software Advice explains why. In fact, a single chart from their research explains why: Eighty-six percent of respondents would pay more for a residential service provider with higher ratings and reviews. More interesting findings in the Slideshare below:   Software Advice IndustryView: Power of Online Reviews for Residential Services from Software Advice

How Twitter CFO Anthony Noto just vindicated us all

Vindication! Vindication for all of us that have accidentally tweeted something publicly when we meant for it to be sent as a direct message on Twitter. I’ve done it. You’ve likely done it. And now, Twitter’s own CFO has gone and done it! Let this serve as a PSA that you should never put anything in a DM that you would not want to be seen by the public. Not only could the recipient tweet it out, but those fat fingers of yours could accidentally share that private message with the world!

New England Patriots’ Twitter automation turns racist

As part of my Reputation Roadkill presentation at Internet Summit, I specifically warned of the dangers of automating Twitter responses–explaining that they can lead to undesired consequences. Not 36 hours later did someone from the audience share with me how the New England Patriots had apparently suffered outrage at the hands of Twitter automation. In an effort to thank each fan that helped them reach 1 million followers, the NFL team tweeted a thank you to each new follower. It looked like this: That’s a lot of fans to thank, so it’s no surprise that they decided to automate the