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Actively Listening

...online reputation management advice, monitoring tips, and updates from the Trackur team

Is social media more important for U.S. CEOs than their U.K. counterparts? See for yourself…

Our friend Dr. Leslie Gaines Ross pointed us to a new study from Brandfog that shows the importance of social media for CEOs. As you might expect, the study suggests… 1. Monitoring social media is an effective way to prevent potential reputation crises… 2. Is an important part of public relations… 3. Helps to increase brand awareness and establish industry thought leadership…   However, what stands out to me is that in every case, the numbers that agree with each statement are lower in the UK than they are in the US. I recall the late nineties and early 2000s

Do you know the 7 big social media trends for 2014?

There’s no doubt that social media listening is still in its infancy. The infographic below demonstrates just that, with only 24% of companies planning to include social media monitoring in their 2014 strategy. Of those that are listening, only 31% think they’re doing it effectively. (Media Mosaic, via MediaBistro)

Julia Louis-Dreyfus defends Rolling Stone’s reputation through humor

On April 8th, Rolling Stone released the cover of their next issue, which featured a naked Julia Louis-Dreyfus, with the Constitution of the United States tattooed down her back. Given that she’s currently experiencing success with her TV show Veep, it was an interesting way to represent the political aspect of her show. There was only one problem with the execution of this idea… …John Hancock didn’t sign the Constitution, he signed the Declaration of Independence. Rather a basic snafu that led to headlines such as: “Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s naked Rolling Stone cover gets an F in U.S. History. Rolling Stone‘s

Why are companies paying $50,000 to have their reputation attacked?

Now here’s a new trend in the world of online reputation management: corporations are paying consultants upwards of $50,000 to have their online reputations attacked. Kind of. They’re actually paying for simulated social media attacks, so that their team can prepare themselves to handle any negative tweets, posts, and feedback. “We wanted to practice in advance of the game, which doesn’t often happen in social media,” said Jaime Stein, senior manager of social media at ING Direct, who oversees a staff of four. Mr. Stein said he told the HootSuite team to be “brutal” and not hold back in the

Be careful what you say about this post, it could land you in jail

Lawmakers in the UK are seeking to beef up an existing law that makes being an internet jerk a criminal act. Under the existing Malicious Communications Act of 1988, anyone found guilty of internet abuse could face up to 6 months in prison. Some now feel that’s not enough and are pushing to have the maximum sentence increased: Ms Bray’s plan would give magistrates the ability to send such cases for trial at crown court, where the jail term given could be four times longer and there is more time to bring a case. The change will be discussed by

Someone at TeamWork Online thought this was a good idea…

I mean, seriously? Someone thought this was smart? Apparently it just slipped through… @unmarketing We meant no disrespect. Within minutes of noticing this we changed reference in the email — TeamWork Online (@TeamWorkOnline) March 19, 2014   As Scott Stratten says, it’s not a typo that slipped through. Within SECONDS of even THINKING this it should have been rejected. It’s buffoonary like this why I’ll have plenty to discuss at my ClickZ Live Keynote on April 2nd! (hat-tip)

Hospitals focus on reputation – new trend?

It seems these days no one is immune to the need for a great reputation.  Hospitals are even focusing on attracting new business by providing better service, amenities, and extras to their patients. Upon finding out that we were expecting a new addition to our family, my husband and I set out to decide where to have this little guy brought into the world.  With our first, it was easy.  We lived in a small mountain town, and there was the hospital 20 minutes away, or the option of three others if we were interested in driving 90 minutes.  On

With 1.6M Recalls, 31 Failures, and 13 Deaths, GM’s Reputation Hinges on Just 3 Words

If you offered a product that resulted in 31 failures and 13 deaths, you’d take that product off the market pretty quickly, right? Well, if you’re General Motors you might decide that to recall 1.6 million cars would hamper your attempt to fight back from bankruptcy and might hurt your already fragile reputation. Evidently you sit on that data for 10 years and hope that it never becomes public. You hope that no one ever discovers the skeleton in your closet. Until February of 2014. That’s when accusations started flying that GM deliberately withheld information that ignition problems in some cars, could