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Actively Listening

...online reputation management advice, monitoring tips, and updates from the Trackur team

Alec Baldwin tries to take back his tarnished reputation

Like me, you probably don’t follow Alec Baldwin closely. Unless you’re a huge fan of 30 Rock or The Hunt for Red October, you’re probably only aware of Baldwin’s career through the lens of the paparazzi. Well, Alec Baldwin has apparently had enough of having his reputation being defined by a media that is reckless with the truth. In a candid article in New York Magazine, Baldwin shares his side of recent stories about him, including him being a homophobe: Then this other thing happens with TMZ and then it becomes a one-two punch. All this is based on the fact

When maggots attack your reputation

I’m a big fan of Chick-fil-A. I love their food, their hospitality, and their food. (I know I said that twice, but I REALLY love their food!) I’ve never had a bad experience with Chick-fil-A’s food, but that’s not to say it doesn’t happen. In fact, their Facebook page often has complaints posted, like this one: OK, so that one is pretty extreme. However, whenever you complain, the fast food company is quick to reply and tell you how to file a formal complaint. What happens next is pretty interesting. Without fail, Chick-fil-A’s fans rush to the company’s defense, and

New libel law affords more protection to those criticizing companies

I’m not a lawyer, but I did study law in England (not as glamorous as it sounds) and so have always had a layman’s fascination with legal topics. So, it makes sense that I would be intrigued by England’s new libel law, known at the Defamation Act 2013. If I understand it correctly, the law aligns itself closer to those we have in the US, in that it makes it harder for a plaintiff to claim libel, without first going through some extra steps, then also proving actual financial damage was inflicted. According to Gorkana… Previously, the fear of legal

Five important ORM lessons learned from parenthood

Last year, I was thrilled when I found out that I’d been chosen to speak at PubCon.  The very next day, I found out that I was expecting my second child.  I was thrown head first into planning for baby while planning for one of the biggest moments in my career in online reputation management to date.  Because of the timing of these two events, I’ve been spending a lot of time comparing the two very different worlds.  One thing I’ve found?  They’re not as different as I may have once thought. It’s always ‘someone else’s’ fault.  Seriously.  Is a

Lululemon acts like a cobra, treats customers like down dogs

I have to admit, as a guy, yoga is not my thing. However, even an uneducated guy knows that Lululemon is a big deal, when it comes to yoga pants. And especially when it comes to mistreating its rabidly loyal customers. Now it seems the company is taking its legendary weirdness to new heights by banning customers that decide to resell any of its products. Eric Lewis, founder of the blog LuluMen, said he was also chastised by the retailer for trying to sell a pair of pants he bought at a recent warehouse sale in Canada. After the college student posted

10 Rules for Crisis Communication [infographic]

The guys over at Agnes + Day (love the play on words) have put together a rather colorful, and useful, infographic showing 10 “rules” for crisis communication. Keep in mind that your rules may be different from those listed, but this is a good start for anyone facing their first reputation crisis…

A Positive Reputation for the Price of an Appetizer? Firebirds Gets It!

I’ve never had a bad dining experience at the Firebirds restaurant in North Hills, Raleigh. That’s a lie. I’ve never left Firebirds thinking I’ve had a bad dining experience. You see, the restaurant has a sixth sense when it comes to unhappy customers. In fact, the management is so good at spotting situations that can lead to unhappy customers, they often fix them, before you even know you’re unhappy! Take last night. We arrived at a very quiet time for an early dinner. At 4:45pm, you don’t expect to have to do much waiting. Unfortunately, it took a lot longer

Buy Trackur CEO Andy Beal’s New Book – Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation

As some of you may know, I wrote the original guide to online reputation management back in 2008. Well, a lot has happened since then, so I am delighted to share news that my new book is now available in both paperback and Kindle versions. Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation is a practical and actionable 30-day guide to build, manage, monitor, and repair personal and corporate reputations. It’s a quick read, but packed with lots of great case studies and tips. Repped is just $12.99 for the paperback, and an amazingly low $6.99 for the Kindle version.

When a Reputation Clean-up Creates More Negative Buzz

When you’re asked to review the online reputation of a 3-star army general, you choose your words carefully. When that general used to be in charge of the missile defense system, and has a reputation for being “toxic,” you choose your words very carefully. I spoke with the Army Times, who asked me to look at the Google profile of Retired Lt. Gen. Patrick O’Reilly and speculate whether he had hired a reputation management firm. I told them… “It does look like a classic case of reputation management,” said Andy Beal, author of Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation.