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Category Archive for ‘Advice’

Court rules there’s no extortion at Yelp…that can be proven

  You hear this complaint a lot in reputation management circles… Mercurio, the owner of an auto-body shop called Wheel Techniques, said that Yelp posted “false reviews” to get him to advertise, and Chan, a dentist, claimed that “Yelp removed nine 5-star reviews” from her page after she refused to advertise, the ruling states. After Chan gave in and signed an advertising contract with Yelp, her overall rating increased to four stars and several five-stars reviews were re-posted, she said. After losing their original class action law suit–claiming Yelp’s extortion–the case was this week similarly dismissed by an appeal court. Of

What do Twitter, Chick-fil-a, Google, and Chevron have in common?

They all make the top ten of Glassdoor’s new infographic showing the companies with the best culture and values–as voted by their employees. The fact that Chick-fil-a makes the list is a strong reminder that your business doesn’t have to have a strong reputation with everyone. If it can resonate with its employees and its customers, it will do well.

Doctor’s office sign claims “zero tolerance” for social media complaints [pic]

A new study shows that Brits are increasingly turning to social media to vent their frustrations and share their complaints. That’s all well and good, unless you happen to be a patient at a Braintree GP surgery. They’ve decided to stretch the NHS zero tolerance policy to social media–meaning that your only option to complain is in writing to the practice manager: The surgery claims they are trying to stop abusive comments and “appalling language” but the actual sign doesn’t seem to reflect that. It would have been better if they had been honest and simply claimed that they are not

Is your online reputation ready for digital shrinkage?

In my recent discussion with Martin Brossman, I mentioned the concept of “digital shrinkage.” For those of you not familiar with the retail term “inventory shrinkage,” it might be good to get that baseline definition: The loss of inventory that can be attributed to factors including employee theft, shoplifting, administrative error, vendor fraud, damage in transit or in store and cashier errors that benefit the customer. In the traditional retail industry, shrinkage is calculated and accepted as a cost of doing business. It can be mitigated with checks and balances, but for the most part, retailers accept that 1 to 3%

Get Trackur CEO Andy Beal’s new reputation management book for just 99 cents! Ends today!

Just a quick note to let you know that my new book, Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation, is currently on sale for just $0.99 for the Kindle version. If you’ve not yet picked up a copy, I promise you’ll find at least one lightbulb tactic that will be worth the dollar you spent. You’d better hurry though. The sale ends tonight! Grab your copy here.

Costco discovers that political perception can become reputation reality

The Washington Times has a piece that highlights the importance of not only realizing the dangers of bringing politics into your business decisions, but the dangers of making a decision that simply appears political. As Ben Carson describes, the former CEO of Costco “made no secret of his profound admiration for President Obama and his policies.” So, when a new book criticizing the president was pulled from Costco’s shelves, many customers assumed it was a politically motivated decision. That wasn’t the case: Because of Mr. Sinegal’s very public support of Mr. Obama, the recent withdrawal of the book “America: Imagine a

New report reveals the star rating too low to trust local business reputations

When it comes to spreading the word about your local business’s great reputation, asking customers to recommend you is not the way to go. Your impressive Facebook Page, parallax scrolling website, and funny Instagram pics are not going to improve your online reputation without something solid to back it up. According to BrightLocal, consumers recommend local companies primarily based on whether they were reliable and professional: On the flip side, consumers researching local businesses are becoming more discerning. Compared to 2013, consumers are reading more reviews before they feel they can trust a local business: Lastly, for those of you

KLM’s World Cup tweet runs afoul of one very important reputation rule

After Delta took a beating on Twitter for its World Cup tweet, you’d think that other companies would learn from their lesson. I guess KLM was at lunch, while the rest of the world took offense, because, after the Netherlands beat Mexico in the World Cup, it posted this to Twitter: Now, I’ve said this many times before, but I’m going to type it really slow, so that it sinks in It’s not your own audience that you need worry about offending, it’s everyone else. Time and time again, we see companies that post something that I’m sure the social media

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